Posted in Charlotte Writes Things, Uncategorized

Charlotte Writes Things | Author Inspirations – V.E.Schwab

schwab 2

I think you could ask pretty much anyone who their “role model” is and they would have an answer. It could be a family member, a friend, a celebrity. Some may even have one from childhood and a different one now they have more of an adult perspective to grasp onto the world with. I’ve had many. I almost like to hord them as if they are trinkets from different parts of my past. When it comes to writing, the person I look up to the most is V.E.Schwab.

V.E.Schwab is a New York Times Best-selling author. She’s written Adult Fantasy, YA paranormal, graphic novels, children’s ghost stories but her very obvious success isn’t what draws me to her. Like many readers, my adventures with her stories began with A Darker Shade Of Magic and when I listened to her interview on the podcast 88 Cups Of Tea, she talked about how she had been told by those in the publishing industry to be less open about what it’s actually like to be in it. She responded to this by saying that it didn’t feel right to sugarcoat her experiences and act like, just because she got that book deal, her life is all sunshine and flowers.

I adore her honesty. She admits how hard touring is on her mental health and how it adds pressure to looming deadlines even though she very much loves meeting her readers. When it comes to drafting a new book, she talks openly about her struggles and how often she needs to remind herself that it’s all one big process and baby steps still get you closer to the end. She dishes out advice and it always seems to pop up on my Twitter timeline when I’m having the worst day and want to throw my laptop out of the window in the hopes that a passing car on the street runs it over.

schwab 1

It’s a reminder that even the greats – the authors that have made incredible impacts in the writing world – are just as human as the rest of us. They have to work through the same fears and problems that those of us aspiring authors do every day. V.E.Schwab has spoken about how, even with her raging success, she’s still had rejections for pitch ideas. Other big fantasy authors such as Neil Gaiman have said that their biggest fear is a blank page. No one is immune from this experience and I admire her so much for standing up and saying “hey guys, this is really hard and you know what? It doesn’t get any easier.”

Do you have any writing inspirations?

Do you have any writing mantras you turn to when having a bad day?

Posted in Charlotte Writes Things, Uncategorized

Charlotte Writes Things | Taking A Break

“You don’t start out writing good stuff. You start out writing crap stuff and thinking it’s good stuff, and then gradually you get better at it.” – Octavia E. Butler

20190605_095515

I am always doing something. More often than not, I’m multi-tasking too. When I wrote the notes that would become this blog post, I was watching a movie. While writing these very words, I am catching up on the latest episode of Jane The Virgin. I fill up my time with so many things that often I double up just to get through it all. This often leads to burning myself out. Which is the position I’ve found myself in with my latest project.

I’ve mentioned before about the little targets I set myself but those writing sessions only go so far when the story itself isn’t working. I’ve spent the past month jumping around the timeline to bits I feel like I’m ready to work on only to hit wall after wall.

So I’ve taken the hardest decision of all: taking a break. It’s not often talked about because writing is often seen as a rush to a metaphorical finish line, but taking time away from a project is just as important as working day in and day out on it. For now, this story needs that breathing space and I need to take the time to rest a little and recover.

It’s easy to feel guilty about it. It’s very difficult to do and I think almost every day about whether it is the right decision or not. But I need to stick to it. How long will the break be? I don’t know. Will I ever return to this project? I don’t know. And I’m starting to learn that it’s alright. Slowly but surely. This project, or whatever I move on to next, will be worth it for the time out I take right now.

Have you ever taken a break?

Do you feel guilt for not writing?

Posted in Charlotte Writes Things

Charlotte Writes Things | Setting Targets

“Deadlines just aren’t real to me until I’m staring one in the face.” – Rick Riordan

tree

Deadlines are a massive topic of discussion for authors in the publishing industry. As more and more contracted writers have started being vocal about the realities of three books deals etc, it’s kind of impossible to ignore just how stressful they can be. The main one that always springs to mind when I think of deadlines is best-selling fantasy author V.E.Schwab who did a series of tweets about the fact that she was set to embark on a three month book tour. Alongside meeting upwards of 300 people at events in each city, she still had to average 2,000 words a day in order to get her next book in on time.

It would be unfair to not acknowledge the slight advantage I have of being an unpublished the author: I have all the time in the world, in fact, too much time. I struggle greatly with the idea that I may never get published, that simply finishing and editing a book isn’t enough when there are agents to query who will reject me and even if I get that glorious “yes” there’s no guarantee that a publisher will buy my book at the end of it.

So long story short, I make my own targets. My mantra is “we measure time spent not words” because I think it is incredibly important to count any time spent researching or planning as part of the process. You could finish a writing day with no words written and feel completely defeated when in actuality you’re discounting the fact that you spent four hours looking into some incredibly niche thing you want to include in your story, or you did rubbish drawings of locations or even just worked through what you’d like to happen in a scene. Every little second, minute, and hour spent all adds up to the bigger picture. I am to spend at least 30 minutes a day working on my current project. It can seem measly but if I get a scene sorted, or even just a paragraph written, it’s one more scene or paragraph than I had the day before. Words are just sentences which are paragraphs which are chapters which are books.

Everyone talks far too often about word counts: from people creating their own writing sprint months, to writing sprints with the aim of 500 words at the end, to the big old NanoWriMo where people (and I made this mistake only once) try to write a whopping 50,000 words in a single month. It’s too easy to look at others and see yourself in comparison to how much they can achieve. But we all find our own ways to work; the best thing for us.

Do you set deadlines for yourself?

What do you do if you don’t meet them?

Posted in Charlotte Writes Things

Charlotte Writes Things | The Meat

“The rules on what is possible and impossible in the arts were made by people who had not tested the bounds of the possible by going beyond them.”

20190319_173008

I decided that the best way to talk about my planning process when it comes to writing is to break it into two parts. The previous part, “the skeleton”, focused on getting down the initial framework on my next project. This one is about the bigger details; what I lovingly call “the meat.”

Once I have the basics down – characters, motivations, locations, concepts- I then begin to work my way through the big plot points in the narrative. This step is different pretty much every time because sometimes aspects come to fruition quicker than others. But this is where I plan out any scenes, dialogue between characters, while also keeping things open to happen naturally during writing; it’s remarkable how much my stories evolve in the writing stage from what I first planned out. In the past I’ve posed two options to myself of where a plot twist can go and then something else jumps up while I’m working on it that was completely unexpected but just works so much better than whatever I had in the pipeline.

It’s also often this part of the process I return to when I hit a wall writing. I have to come back here and re-evaluate things and work out which cog in the machine needs replacing with a shiny new piece to get it working again.

Do you plan? If so, what are your tips and tricks? Do you have a particular thing you simply have to do?

 

Posted in Charlotte Writes Things

Charlotte Writes Things | The Skeleton

“Overnight sucess is almost always a myth. Half of this industry is luck, and half is the refusal to quit.” – V.E.Schwab

20190319_172935

When it comes to new ideas I always start with what I call “the skeleton.” My stories nearly always begin with an initial concept or a random line; sometimes it ends up being a possible lead character just for my brain to change the game up a little. Slowly but surely, I start to build the framework.

I always focus on populating the world first- from characters to locations- to maybe even a central plot point that I have fully fleshed out in my mind before then moving on to the next stage which I call “the meat” (more on that in another post). I refer to this point in my planning as “the skeleton” because it’s all about getting those bones and putting them roughly in the right place so that everything can function below the surface.

It’s always the longest part of planning for me because I can’t start working on a story until I have enough of the proverbial map filled out to know where I’m going. Sometimes all the framework elements come within a couple of weeks from the initial idea or character motivation, others (like a project I’m currently working on) have taken several years to get to the point where I can even consider writing.

How do you tackle planning? Do you have a particular order things need to be done in? Or do you not even plan and instead chose to wing it?

Posted in Charlotte Writes Things

Charlotte Writes Things | Writing Playlists

“There are no laws for the novel. There never have been, nor can there ever be.” – Doris Lessing.

writing playlists

When it comes to sitting down and committing to writing sprints, silence is my enemy. That seemingly never-ending quiet just makes it all too easy for my mind to drift, for me to pull open a window and call down the internet’s many rabbit holes, and make me feel almost uncomfortable. I can’t pinpoint the how or the why I work better with some sort of background noise (often I multi-task and catch up on my TV shows/ movies while working away at my laptop), but it’s always been the way and so I decided to embrace it many a year ago.

Joining the online book community and seeing how many of my author inspirations  created playlists to act as the soundtrack for their books was really interesting. It had become a norm. While I’ve recently gone down the same route for my own projects to help me get into the right mindset for the varying narratives, my absolute gem for writing sessions is my generic “writing playlist” which is a compilation of my favourite score music from films.

t4wg9dsvohiefdvihokefwd

Backed up by Harry Potter, The Book Thief, The Maze Runner, How To Train Your Dragon score tracks, I am able to become fully immersed in the worlds I’m creating and treat it as something serious that I’m working on rather than just a cute little hobby (but of course there’s nothing wrong with that)! It helps to block out everything around me while I weave the various threads of an every changing world together. And that is its own form of magic.

Do you have any special requirements in order to write?

Do you indulge in music or is silence golden?

Posted in discussion, Uncategorized

A Conversation With K.M.Robinson

author photo

When I was first introduced to K.M.Robinson she was a social media guru teaching classes on the best ways for authors to utilize online platforms, along with growing her photography portfolio. Since then she has not only become a dear friend of mine, but gone on to grow an empire of books. As she continues to grow her fanbase, her knew Aladdin retelling marks the 23rd addition to her catalogue. I had the pleasure of getting to sit down and talk with her about books, advice for aspiring authors, and all things fairy tale.

For those who aren’t familiar with you and your books. Tell us about you!

I’m K.M. Robinson, author of retellings, dystopians, sci fi, fantasy, mermaid, cyberpunk, and steampunk novels. I’m also a social media marketing strategist who teaches entrepreneurs to to build profitable brands through smart social media strategy, and a professional photographer. I’m super friendly on social media and have created an incredible tribe of fans that I like to traumatize with my books. They’ve actually made support groups to get through some of them. It’s pretty awesome!

Your “trademark” has become writing fairy tale retellings. What is is about this genre that keeps you writing within it?

There are so many stories to tell and so many ways to write them. I’ve already written certain characters, but I still have two/three/four more ideas for different versions of their stories with other characters involved. All I have  to do is wonder what would happen if I dropped a certain character in a different setting and suddenly we have a brand new series. It’s an incredibly wide world with so much wiggle room. I can’t get enough! I also really like learning the “true” stories of these characters; the parts history forgot to tell us or flat out lied about.

wdusbja

3.) You also shoot your own photography for/design your own covers. Was this a conscious decision or happy accident? 

I was a photographer first and many of my photo series inspired my writing, so it’s always something on my list of priorities when discussing contracts with publishers. I’ve taken a lot of time to study the industry and really know what sells for covers and what doesn’t. So when other authors/publishers started asking me to design for them as well, it was a natural transition. I really love being able to do most of my own covers because I can bring my stories to life in a way others wouldn’t be able to.

You’re very active on social media especially with instagram livestreams. Do you feel that social media is a significant tool aspiring writers need to make use of?

Absolutely. Social media is the best way to marker yourself and your products as a brand/business owner. It’s something all entrepreneurs (and that’s what an author is) need to learn as early as possible: Studying the algorithms, knowing what the platforms value to make such we get as much as a reach as possible, learning how to engage with people on the platforms, and studying how to create valuable content is essential. A lot of people see it as work but it’s such a fun way to connect with people and make new fans/friends. I adore studying social media and learning how to work with it. I’ve made so many new fans and great business connections just from being friendly and chatting with people – it’s great.

rgfvdcx

Out of the many books you’ve written, is there a particular that’s your favourite?

My debut Golden, and my second book Jaded are definitely my favourite. I’v also really fallen in love with Sugarcoated. Strong leading ladies, assassination attempts, really cute guys. I love them!

What are some of your favourite fairy tale retellings?

The very first retelling that really stuck with me was The True Stories Of The Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka. It’s a picture book I read back in elementary school that told the story of how the Big Bad Wolf wasn’t actually bad and the little pigs were less than awesome. 

The idea that we might not actually know the true story-or the full story- really intrigued me. What if other stories were told like that? What if the villains weren’t actually villains? What if the heroes/victors lied? The “what if” questions led me to start looking for the second side to every story and really left this burning passion for me to discover more about the fairy tales I knew and loved. They’re directly responsible for me writing Golden, my Goldilocks and the Three Bears retelling. The rest is history. 

book cover

Tell us about your new book!

Lions And Lamps is a steampunk Aladdin retelling. It pulls a lot more from the original Aladdin story (which was Chinese) rather than the version Disney did. My Aladdin lives with his mother after his father was murdered last year. His evil uncle, Kacper, is now trying to drive a wedge between Aladdin and his mother because he wants to look good in front of his sister-in-law now that his brother is dead. 

Cyra was an orphan who was taken in by the Governor seven years ago and trained to steal an airship in a competition that only he had advanced knowledge of. Last year, Cyra stole the airship and won, but this year she’s sneaking into the competition against the Governor’s wishes. 

When Aladdin and Cyra meet, sparks fly but not in a good way. There’s a lot of betrayal and back stabbing and a genie with an agenda. 

I’m so excited that its now out in the world, traumatizing my readers once more. Wait, did I say that out loud? Oops. 

All of K.M.Robinson’s books are available on E-book and from Amazon. She’s also hosting a sale of covers she’s designed for author use which is on until Tuesday 16th April and more information about that can be found here here.

K.M.Robinson can be found at:

 

Posted in Charlotte Writes Things, Uncategorized

Charlotte Writes Things | The First Draft

“The first draft is a secret that no one ever needs to see, but it leads to the second draft, where the book really begins.” – Patrick Ness

vhmn

 

I decided that, after another joint winning Twitter poll, my next writing pot would be focused on that dreaded first draft since I’m currently in the middle of one.

No one likes drafting. If even big name, best-selling authors like V.E.Schwab and Neil Gaiman struggle with them, then there’ really no hope for the rest of us. To me, a first draft is like breaking into a run only to collapse in a fit of exhaustion a few feet later. That shiny new idea feels exciting and fun but the second I hit a mental wall it’s far too easy for me to abandon a project; to convince myself that I’m just not ready to tackle it yet and I’ll come back later.

The big fact I have to constantly remind myself of is that a first draft is only going to be seen by me. Which is important to remember because I am of the firm belief that you need to enjoy your own story before anyone else does and the entire project becomes influenced by what other people think you should do. In this early stage I think it’s also too easy to get hung up on words because you don’t have any to work with yet. It can be very disheartening to work for an hour and find you’ve written 100 words. It’s easy to feel like you’ve not made any progression and completely disregard that you technically spent an hour working. This is where my mantra “we measure time spent not words” comes into play because why should time spent trying to make a chapter work and deleting everything, research, or planning not count as progress? After all, they’re just as important as writing. I tend to use the forest app to mark my progress (more on that in another post).

If I’m really struggling to keep momentum but I can visualise scenes later in the plot then I make that shift and write those. Words are words are words, and I’ll do anything to keep going. Even if I want to give up 90% of the time.

What are your tips and tricks for handling a first draft?

Posted in Charlotte Writes Things, Uncategorized

Charlotte Writes Things | Planner vs Pantser

“Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen.” – John Steinbeck

 

20190119_132210It’s a common topic discussed and one that, in fact, I was asked to write about by fellow reviewer Anna. Writers are often asked if they are a “planner or pantser.” Simply put, do you plan or go in with no plan? When I tried to think of what other writers do, I remembered when I went to an event for The Iron Trial with Holly Black and Cassandra Clare and they talked about this very subject. Cassandra Clare has to plan every single detail down to when a character blinks, whereas Holly Black likes to go in with no plan whatsoever because she likes surprises. Naturally, you can imagine this made their partnership on the series a tad difficult.

I have to admit that I’m both a pantser and planner in equal measures. I have the initial concept in mind, along with characters and some understanding of location. When it comes to writing a chapter or scene, I like to have a framework – some idea of where I’m walking – but I never fully know what’s going to happen. I always leave room for things to happen naturally and so that the characters are able to think for themselves. It’s in these moments of no planning where new locations sprout, new characters join the story, and old characters have died. Sometimes I start writing and don’t even have the ending figured out.

20190119_132229

I’m hoping to do a whole seperate post about how exactly I plan a new project. But for now I pose the questions to you:

Are you a planner or a pantser?
Do you have anything you need to do before starting a new project?

Posted in Charlotte Writes Things

Charlotte Writes Things | An Introduction

20181226_112030

 

I’ve wanted to start a series about writing for a while but held back for a multitude of reasons. Among them are niggles like: would anyone actually care? Will I bin it off when I burn myself out for trying to do too much on my blog at once? And will people just roll their eyes thinking that I’m another “book blogger turned writer”? But then I sat back and remembered that I’ve been a writer for longer than I’ve been  book blogger, and I’ve been a reader for longer than I have a writer. And also it’s kind of fundamental to be a reader if you’re going to be a writer. So, anyway, I’ve pushed those thoughts aside and I present to you Charlotte Writes Things (yes, very on brand and took me two seconds to come up with).

A lot of my writing journey has been accidental. By that I mean, a lot of how I’ve grown as a writer, minus the University side of things where I did joint honours in Creative Writing and English Literature, hasn’t been planned. I just wrote stories. Ridiculous ones from a young age, writing them more for me than to be read by anyone else (though there was one time I sold copies of my book to people in primary school for a pound each). I just wrote stories more about myself in certain situations and working out how I would handle them before I moved on to characters that had barely any of me in them; those kind of people I only wished I could be. It was only really when my mother approached me during my A-Levels with a list of universities she’d found that did joint honours Creative Writing that I realised that I could actually bring what I loved into the education sphere, but that I also had the support of a parent in what I wanted to hopefully make some money from in the future.

As I’ve said, my own story is littered with accidents. I was still just writing stories and thrown into uncomfortable writing situations at University where I was expected to write in styles I’d never tried and from briefs that didn’t interest me. It wasn’t until someone I knew told me that I had to read this John Green book called The Fault In Our Stars, and I did, that I discovered that I’d actually been writing Young Adult stories without actually realising. So naturally, I threw myself into everything I could find on those shelves in bookstores, desperate to work my way through everything I had missed out on. I’d mainly just read early teen books and Harry Potter over and over up until this point. It wasn’t until I started reading The Mortal Instruments series in preparation for the film adaptation that I discovered that, not only do I write Young Adult, I also wanted to write fantasy as well. See? Accident after accident.

Some things have obviously been more planned. Such as this blog to try and create a presence online, finding the online YA book community and, while I promise that I do try to write my stories following a plan, I often stray off the path and barely recognise them by the end of it.

So I’m starting a new series and I plan to cover a whole range of topics from planning to drafting, authors that inspire me, and querying as I plan to bite that bullet in 2019. If there’s anything you’d like to see me talk about to do with writing, please let me know!

Here’s to another long writing year!