Posted in Charlotte Writes Things, Uncategorized

Charlotte Writes Things | The First Draft

“The first draft is a secret that no one ever needs to see, but it leads to the second draft, where the book really begins.” – Patrick Ness

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I decided that, after another joint winning Twitter poll, my next writing pot would be focused on that dreaded first draft since I’m currently in the middle of one.

No one likes drafting. If even big name, best-selling authors like V.E.Schwab and Neil Gaiman struggle with them, then there’ really no hope for the rest of us. To me, a first draft is like breaking into a run only to collapse in a fit of exhaustion a few feet later. That shiny new idea feels exciting and fun but the second I hit a mental wall it’s far too easy for me to abandon a project; to convince myself that I’m just not ready to tackle it yet and I’ll come back later.

The big fact I have to constantly remind myself of is that a first draft is only going to be seen by me. Which is important to remember because I am of the firm belief that you need to enjoy your own story before anyone else does and the entire project becomes influenced by what other people think you should do. In this early stage I think it’s also too easy to get hung up on words because you don’t have any to work with yet. It can be very disheartening to work for an hour and find you’ve written 100 words. It’s easy to feel like you’ve not made any progression and completely disregard that you technically spent an hour working. This is where my mantra “we measure time spent not words” comes into play because why should time spent trying to make a chapter work and deleting everything, research, or planning not count as progress? After all, they’re just as important as writing. I tend to use the forest app to mark my progress (more on that in another post).

If I’m really struggling to keep momentum but I can visualise scenes later in the plot then I make that shift and write those. Words are words are words, and I’ll do anything to keep going. Even if I want to give up 90% of the time.

What are your tips and tricks for handling a first draft?

Posted in Charlotte Writes Things, Uncategorized

Charlotte Writes Things | Planner vs Pantser

“Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen.” – John Steinbeck

 

20190119_132210It’s a common topic discussed and one that, in fact, I was asked to write about by fellow reviewer Anna. Writers are often asked if they are a “planner or pantser.” Simply put, do you plan or go in with no plan? When I tried to think of what other writers do, I remembered when I went to an event for The Iron Trial with Holly Black and Cassandra Clare and they talked about this very subject. Cassandra Clare has to plan every single detail down to when a character blinks, whereas Holly Black likes to go in with no plan whatsoever because she likes surprises. Naturally, you can imagine this made their partnership on the series a tad difficult.

I have to admit that I’m both a pantser and planner in equal measures. I have the initial concept in mind, along with characters and some understanding of location. When it comes to writing a chapter or scene, I like to have a framework – some idea of where I’m walking – but I never fully know what’s going to happen. I always leave room for things to happen naturally and so that the characters are able to think for themselves. It’s in these moments of no planning where new locations sprout, new characters join the story, and old characters have died. Sometimes I start writing and don’t even have the ending figured out.

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I’m hoping to do a whole seperate post about how exactly I plan a new project. But for now I pose the questions to you:

Are you a planner or a pantser?
Do you have anything you need to do before starting a new project?

Posted in Charlotte Writes Things

Charlotte Writes Things | An Introduction

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I’ve wanted to start a series about writing for a while but held back for a multitude of reasons. Among them are niggles like: would anyone actually care? Will I bin it off when I burn myself out for trying to do too much on my blog at once? And will people just roll their eyes thinking that I’m another “book blogger turned writer”? But then I sat back and remembered that I’ve been a writer for longer than I’ve been  book blogger, and I’ve been a reader for longer than I have a writer. And also it’s kind of fundamental to be a reader if you’re going to be a writer. So, anyway, I’ve pushed those thoughts aside and I present to you Charlotte Writes Things (yes, very on brand and took me two seconds to come up with).

A lot of my writing journey has been accidental. By that I mean, a lot of how I’ve grown as a writer, minus the University side of things where I did joint honours in Creative Writing and English Literature, hasn’t been planned. I just wrote stories. Ridiculous ones from a young age, writing them more for me than to be read by anyone else (though there was one time I sold copies of my book to people in primary school for a pound each). I just wrote stories more about myself in certain situations and working out how I would handle them before I moved on to characters that had barely any of me in them; those kind of people I only wished I could be. It was only really when my mother approached me during my A-Levels with a list of universities she’d found that did joint honours Creative Writing that I realised that I could actually bring what I loved into the education sphere, but that I also had the support of a parent in what I wanted to hopefully make some money from in the future.

As I’ve said, my own story is littered with accidents. I was still just writing stories and thrown into uncomfortable writing situations at University where I was expected to write in styles I’d never tried and from briefs that didn’t interest me. It wasn’t until someone I knew told me that I had to read this John Green book called The Fault In Our Stars, and I did, that I discovered that I’d actually been writing Young Adult stories without actually realising. So naturally, I threw myself into everything I could find on those shelves in bookstores, desperate to work my way through everything I had missed out on. I’d mainly just read early teen books and Harry Potter over and over up until this point. It wasn’t until I started reading The Mortal Instruments series in preparation for the film adaptation that I discovered that, not only do I write Young Adult, I also wanted to write fantasy as well. See? Accident after accident.

Some things have obviously been more planned. Such as this blog to try and create a presence online, finding the online YA book community and, while I promise that I do try to write my stories following a plan, I often stray off the path and barely recognise them by the end of it.

So I’m starting a new series and I plan to cover a whole range of topics from planning to drafting, authors that inspire me, and querying as I plan to bite that bullet in 2019. If there’s anything you’d like to see me talk about to do with writing, please let me know!

Here’s to another long writing year!

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Going Nowhere

Blurb: “Life has changed since university. Robert, Louisa and Jim’s careers are going nowhere. Yet when the three friends are brought together once more, their past regrets will lead them on a trip of ambition, recognition and revenge. Evan Hargreaves is dead. Faced with a new appreciation of their own mortality, the former-classmates embark on an impromptu getaway. But what starts as a simple writer’s retreat to the Sunshine State quickly goes awry.”

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While the purpose of this blog is to deliver book reviews, this time I’m going to be sharing something a little different. I am a third year Creative Writing student and sadly in a few months I’ll be entering the  “real world.” For one of my final projects, we had to produce a publication with the end goal being to sell it to the general public at the big Independent publisher fair which happens every year in Leicester.

I had the honor of working with friends (and super talented writers) Thomas Arthur and Corey Bedford.I couldn’t have picked better people to work on this project with and I’m truly grateful that I had these guys around for when I was on the verge of crying over how much work we had to put into this. But it was so worth it.

People often tell me that I’ll never make a lot of money from being a writer. This is something I accepted long ago. That was never my end goal when it came to writing. I just wanted to write. For me, it’s holding the final product in your hands. Getting to hold “Going Nowhere” after the months of planning, writing and editing was a feeling that I truly cannot put into words.

We have to present them at a showcase at the festival this weekend and hopefully sell all of our copies as it was only a small print run. I’m very proud of this piece because it wasn’t Young Adult, so I had to branch out and even write some poetry (which Corey will know better than anyone how much I struggle with).

It’s been a wonderful adventure and while I’m a little bit sad that it’s over.

On to more writing projects!

– Charlotte

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