Posted in Charlotte Writes Things

Charlotte Writes Things | Setting Targets

“Deadlines just aren’t real to me until I’m staring one in the face.” – Rick Riordan

tree

Deadlines are a massive topic of discussion for authors in the publishing industry. As more and more contracted writers have started being vocal about the realities of three books deals etc, it’s kind of impossible to ignore just how stressful they can be. The main one that always springs to mind when I think of deadlines is best-selling fantasy author V.E.Schwab who did a series of tweets about the fact that she was set to embark on a three month book tour. Alongside meeting upwards of 300 people at events in each city, she still had to average 2,000 words a day in order to get her next book in on time.

It would be unfair to not acknowledge the slight advantage I have of being an unpublished the author: I have all the time in the world, in fact, too much time. I struggle greatly with the idea that I may never get published, that simply finishing and editing a book isn’t enough when there are agents to query who will reject me and even if I get that glorious “yes” there’s no guarantee that a publisher will buy my book at the end of it.

So long story short, I make my own targets. My mantra is “we measure time spent not words” because I think it is incredibly important to count any time spent researching or planning as part of the process. You could finish a writing day with no words written and feel completely defeated when in actuality you’re discounting the fact that you spent four hours looking into some incredibly niche thing you want to include in your story, or you did rubbish drawings of locations or even just worked through what you’d like to happen in a scene. Every little second, minute, and hour spent all adds up to the bigger picture. I am to spend at least 30 minutes a day working on my current project. It can seem measly but if I get a scene sorted, or even just a paragraph written, it’s one more scene or paragraph than I had the day before. Words are just sentences which are paragraphs which are chapters which are books.

Everyone talks far too often about word counts: from people creating their own writing sprint months, to writing sprints with the aim of 500 words at the end, to the big old NanoWriMo where people (and I made this mistake only once) try to write a whopping 50,000 words in a single month. It’s too easy to look at others and see yourself in comparison to how much they can achieve. But we all find our own ways to work; the best thing for us.

Do you set deadlines for yourself?

What do you do if you don’t meet them?