fantasy · review

Short Stories from Hogwarts of Power, Politics And Pesky Poltergeists – J.K.Rowling

“Slughorn’s genuine remorse for the damage he had done in telling Riddle what he wanted to know is conclusive proof that he is not, and never was, Death Eater material.”

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Blurb: “These stories of power, politics and pesky poltergeists give you a glimpse into the darker side of the wizarding world, revealing the ruthless roots of Professor Umbridge, the lowdown on the Ministers for Magic and the history of the wizarding prison Azkaban. You will also delve deeper into Horace Slughorn’s early years as Potions master at Hogwarts – and his acquaintance with one Tom Marvolo Riddle.”

This is the third and final ebook I read in the new Harry Potter collection and it was a very satisfying way to end.

Power, Politics and Pesky Poltergeists focuses on a host of topics such as the backstory of arguably the most hated character from the Harry Potter series: Dolores Umbridge, a chapter dedicated to our favourite poltergeist Peeves, and an analysis of the fatal mistake Horace Slughorn made with Tom Riddle and how he coped with the aftermath, along with his role in the battle of Hogwarts.

What I found the most interesting in this collection were the chapters addressing the history of the Ministry of Magic and how it came to be along with the history behind the famous Azkaban prison.

It was another insightful read and just adds to how vast and how much of this world J.K.Rowling thought about when she was working on the Harry Potter books.

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fantasy · review

Hogwarts: An Unreliable Guide – J.k.Rowling

“The sorting hat spent nearly four minutes trying to decide whether it should place Hermione in Ravenclaw or Gryffindor. In Neville’s case, the Hat was determined to place him in Gryffindor: Neville, intimidated by that house’s reputation for bravery, requested a placing in Hufflepuff.”

 

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Blurb: “Hogwarts: And Incomplete and Unreliable Guide takes you on a journey to Hogwarts school of Witchcraft and Wizardry. You’ll venture into the Hogwarts grounds, become better acquainted with the more permanent residents, learn more about lessons and discover secrets of the castle.”

This is the second of the new Harry Potter ebooks that I decided to pick up because they’re quick and easy reads.

Hogwarts: An Incomplete and Unreliable Guide is a wonderful collection that pays attention to the relevance of Kings Cross Station to the both J.K.Rowling and the world of Harry Potter, an insight into the life of the maurauder’s and how the famous map came to be. The reader can expect to learn about the Hogwarts ghosts and their original names along with those that never made it into the books.

Secrets about the Mirror of Erised are revealed and there’s a quite funny chapter dedicated to the painting of Sir Cadogan which book fan may remember from Harry Potter and The Prisoner of Azkaban. Plus my personal favourite, a chapter about the Hufflepuff common room (I wear my badger with pride!)

As I’ve said before, these are pottermore essays so if you frequent the site a lot (especially in its original format) then it’s likely you’ve already seen these but this was certainly my favourite as it focused a lot more of aspects of the school itself such as what classes students study in year one and what options they get to choose later on.

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fantasy · review

Short Stories from Hogwarts of Heroism, Hardship and Dangerous Hobbies – J.K.Rowling

“Minerva McGonagall was one of only a handful of people who knew, or suspected, how dreadful a moment it was for Albus Dumbledore when, in 1945, he made the decision to confront and defeat the dark wizard Gellert Grindelwald.”

 

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Blurb: “These stories of heroism, hardship and dangerous hobbies profile two of the Harry Potter stories’ most courageous and iconic characters: Minerva McGonagall and Remus Lupin. J.K.Rowling also gives us a peak behind the closed curtain of Sybill Trelwaney’s life, and you’ll encounter the reckless, magical-beast-loving Silvanus Kettleburn along the way.”

When I first heard about even more Harry Potter material being launched into the world, I was both excited and sceptical. I will be reviewing each book over the course of this week so if you’re interested, keep an eye out.

This collection is basically the short stories that can be found on Pottermore, which as a free site makes the release of these ebooks feel very much like another chance to cash in on the new hype around the series. However, if you’re someone who’s a sucker for backstories then you’ll really enjoy Heroism, Hardship and Dangerous Hobbies.

It’s split into four sections, focusing on different heroic characters from the Harry Potter series. Those are: Minerva McGonagall, Remus Lupin, Sybill Trelawny and Silvanus Kettleburn. The reader is given an insight into the lives of each of these characters along with learning more about the history of aspects they are linked to such as the “prejudice of werewolves” for Lupin and “history of the animagus” for McGonagall.

It’s a fun, quick little read and sure to give heart-warming feelings to any Harry Potter fans.

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children's fiction · fantasy · review

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Illustrated) – J.k.Rowling & Jim Kay

“There will be books written about Harry – every child in our world will know his name.”

 

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Blurb: “Harry Potter’s life changes forever on his eleventh birthday, when beetle-eyed giant Rubeus Hagrid delivers a letter and some astonishing news. Harry Potter is no ordinary boy: he’s a wizard. And an extraordinary adventure is about to begin. The first ever Illustrated edition of J.K.Rowling’s magical classic is packed with glorious colour illustrations by Jim Kay, winner of the Kate Greenaway Medal. An utterly enchanting feast of a book, perfect for devoted fans and new readers alike.”

It’s no secret that I love Harry Potter. When Bloomsbury announced there would be new illustrated editions coming out each year I was beyond excited: an opportunity to experience my love for this story in a new format.

I finally sat down with my massive, very heavy copy and started reading. I was instantly sucked back into this world: reading about characters and a magical world I’d grown up being a part of. Through my re-read I decided to bump up my rating of this book to the full five stars. What is truly wonderful about this book is that, with the combination of the words and the illustrations, it felt like I was reading it again for the first time. There is the element of surprise as you don’t know what scenes are going to come to life in glorious colour. It made the whole reading experience even more exciting.

Through reading the first book again I was reminded of how fantastic and magical this story is and decided to bump up my rating to five stars.

The thrill I get from this new edition is knowing that a whole new generation will be able to experience the story with the pictures to go along with it.

I honestly cannot justify how beautiful this book is and while it’s  quite pricey, it is worth it if you can afford it.

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fantasy · review

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child -J.K.Rowling, John Tiffany and Jack Thorne

“Hogwarts will be the making of you, Albus. I promise you, there is nothing to be frightened of there.”

 

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Blurb: “It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the ministry of magic, a husband, and father of three school-age children. While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes darkness comes from unexpected places.”

When it was first announced that there was going to be, in essence, another Harry Potter book, naturally I experienced mixed emotions. Harry Potter remains to be my all-time favourite series to the point where I feel like it’s a part of me. Alongside that the ending was so perfect that I was faced with the reality of what may happen if this extension was sub-par in comparison. After all, you can’t unread a book. I was happy to get an opportunity to experience this new story in some form as tickets to the West End shows are so limited that even if I managed to get my hands on them, I wouldn’t be able to afford travel costs to London.

The story takes place right where Deathly Hallows leaves off: on platform 9 ¾ with Harry sending his son Albus off to Hogwarts for the first time. I expected Albus to be the primary focus on this adventure and while he is in a lot of ways, we get to see into the lives of our favourite golden trio and what became of them nineteen years after the battle of Hogwarts.

The first thing I will say about Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is that you can’t really give it a rave review or a terrible rating because this is a script and plays are meant to be seen not read. It took a while to get used to the format but once getting over that hurdle it’s easy to follow what’s happening. A lot is left to your own imagination as you’re just reading stage directions and dialogue rather than getting the pages of description that you would if it was a novel. I really enjoyed the path this story took and it’s easy to see why Scorpius Malfoy is becoming a favourite. I feel like the right parts of the adventures were depicted through the scenes and I just felt like I was home. There are a few things I found issues with and sometimes I felt the turn of events were too convenient but overall, as an addition to the Harry Potter timeline, I am very happy with it.

I’ve seen a lot of reviews saying that Cursed Child reads like fan fiction because the characters don’t “read” authentically and while I understand why readers think that, it’s important to remember that these characters fought in a war and they are all in their late 30’s so Harry is bound to not be like he was when he was 11.

Personally I found the first part much better than the second part which I think could have done with more work.

I came out of this experience sad that it’s over, relieved that it lives up to my expectations, but also happy getting to see how everyone was doing nineteen years later.

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discussion · fantasy

The Importance of Hermione Granger

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In honour of the release of additional Harry Potter material in the form of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, it seems only fitting to talk about how much this series has shaped my life. However, that could take years to fully explain so for now you will have to accept this rather shortened version.

I first discovered the Harry Potter books when I was 7/8 years old. I was wandering around the giant metal crates of books as the Scholastic book fair was at my primary school. My mum had always pushed me towards reading: if I wanted a toy she would make me wait a week and if I still wanted it then I could have it. If it was a book, I could have it right away. She sent me to school that day with money to go to the book fair and get whatever I want. That day when I eagerly scanned the shelves of the various containers, I came across a book called Harry Potter and the chamber of secrets. At the time I wasn’t aware this was the second book and I devoured it. I found out that there were in fact three books out at that point and my first read through went 2nd book, 3rd book, 1st book and then 4-7.

There’s no way I can really encapsulate how much this series meant to me, not only growing up, but even now. It gave that escapism I needed as a child and I was just in awe of this world that I was thrown into. I followed this small orphan boy into a world of magic and wonder, facing something so much bigger than him. I pictured myself fighting alongside them, defending them where needed. I saw myself sat in black robes lined with yellow at the Hufflepuff table in the Great Hall. I had found a place where I belonged. My mum would let me read one chapter a night before bed and then take the book off me and read it herself. We always had 2 bookmarks in our copy of the most recent book because she would take it to work with her and I’d get it when I got home from school. My most prominent childhood memory is sitting in class and my teacher declaring that our reading hour had started. Every single child in that room pulled out a copy of Harry potter and the Order of the Phoenix and began reading. Including my teacher.

Naturally, I adore the movies but there’s so much magic that you don’t get in those compared to the books and every year I find myself coming back to those books, even if it is only one of them. This series was by no means the first I read as a child, but it was the first that really stuck with me. When we went on holidays where we took the car (like getting the ferry across to France) I would demand we listen to the Harry potter audiobooks and I’d sit in the back reading the book along with the soothing tones of Stephen Fry.

When the final book came out, I stared at it for the first two days. We had two copies of the book at that point so mum was well into her copy, but I was terrified of the adventure ending, of parting away with the characters that had been the only real friends I ever had. One night, at 4am, mum came running into my room because I was hysterically crying; Fred Weasley had just died. At that time, I didn’t realise that they would continue walking alongside me to this day. At twenty years old, I was having fights with university friends about which Hogwarts house was superior, my university had both a Harry Potter and a Quidditch society. Some of the best people in my life right now became my friends because of our love for this story. At nearly twenty three, my car keys are attached to a Hufflepuff crest keychain. When I went to the Harry Potter worlds in Universal and the Harry Potter studios, I cried.

This blog post is title “the importance of Hermione Granger” because she was the first time I saw myself as a character in a book. Of course I’d read many books with characters who loved reading but Hermione Granger didn’t just love reading, she loved learning too. She didn’t just have a fascination for the magical subjects of Hogwarts (as she’d lived 11 years of her life in a non-magical world) but she even loved Muggle Studies; a topic about something she already knew probably more of than the teachers did. She is made fun of throughout the books for being the one with her hand always in the air to answer questions, always doing her homework on time and demanding that Harry and Ron start revising for their exams. Her knowledge saves Harry and Ron’s lives countless times. Out of all the things she could use a time turner for in the third book (minus the obvious plot point) she uses it to attend more classes than is physically possible to do without manipulating time. In Deathly Hallows she fills her bag with over ten books just in case there might be any useful information in them that could help further down the line: something that Harry doesn’t even think of when he originally plans to go alone.

My point is she loved reading and she loved learning but more importantly she never changed. She could’ve so easily shrunk inside herself and contained the things that made her such a remarkable character but she never hid her love for either of those things. She showed me that devotion to something you love is important and you should never ever be afraid to passionate about the things that mean the most to you.
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children's fiction · fantasy · review

Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix – J.K.Rowling

 

“He felt as though his heart was going to explode with pleasure; he was flying again, flying away from Privet Drive as he’d been fantasising about all Summer, he was going home… for a few glorious moments, all his problems seemed to recede to nothing, insignificant in the vast, starry sky.”

 

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Blurb: “Harry Potter is due to start his fifth year at Hogwarts school of Witchcraft and Wizardry. His best friend Ron and Hermione have been very secretive all summer and he is desperate to get back to School and find out what has been going on. However, what Harry discovers is far more devastating than he could ever have expected…”

It’s taken over a year but I have finally finished my re-read of Harry Potter (in the fancy new UK editions). It’s not the first time I’ve re-read the series and I have no doubt it won’t be the last. This is the fifth book in the series, so you can clearly tell I didn’t re-read the series in order. One thing I have discovered is that every time I pick up one of the Harry Potter books and read them again, I become even more disillusioned by the films. I understand that changes need to be made etc. when it comes to an adaptation, but I just feel like you miss out on so much if you haven’t read the source material.

Like I said, this is the fifth book in the Harry Potter series and the longest; reaching exactly 800 pages in this edition. What I really like about this book that following on from the events in Goblet of Fire, is that everything has the “calm before the storm” feeling. Horrible things are looming that people are trying their hardest to ignore, but for the most part there’s enough warmth and joy that it makes you feel like, for now, things are continuing as normal.  You have Fred and George up to their usual antics, new and exciting classes and creatures, contrasting with Harry’s negative battle with being left out of situations, being left with no information and no contact with his friends. This book is when he starts to internalise a lot of what he’s going through and becomes quite bitter. He gets upset, he gets angry (and not just over exams) and that only gets worse when the Ministry of Magic appoints Dolores Umbridge as the new Defense Against The Dark Arts teacher. Her character is insufferable as she grows in power throughout the plot, but one thing I will say is that she is tame in the movie adaptation compared to this book. She gave me headaches. A lot.

A while ago, someone said to me that J.K.Rowling is a “good storyteller, but not a good writer.” At first I was utterly flabbergasted. I think everyone can agree that Harry Potter has been hugely successful and continues to be long since the last book was released. However, upon my overall re-read, I’ve learnt that the person who made those comments is right. Maybe it’s because I do a lot of editing, or maybe it’s because I’m a writer myself, but I found myself saying “I would have cut that”, “oh that’s oddly presented” although you cannot deny that the world she has created is something that will fall into the classics of the future.  She paved the way for stories about magic schools and child wizards.

There’s so many subplots in this book that just root you back into the world, despite not wanting to admit that certain people may be making their return, such as Quidditch, St Mungos hospital, the prefects and Hermione becoming essentially a House Elf Activist. And may this is because I love learning, but it was interesting to see the characters stressing over exams and how the actual exams took place.

Overall, it’s another solid addition to the series and where I feel Rowling starts to get stronger. It’s moved its way up into my top 3 Harry Potter books.
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book tag · discussion · fantasy

Throne Of Glass Tag

This tag was created byAlexaLovesBook and Soobsessedwith and when I saw it was Throne of Glass themed I HAD to do it!

Lysandra – a book with a cover change you loved

 

 

Ironically my choice for this one is the book this tag is based off. Throne of Glass definitely has one of the best cover re-designs I’ve seen. I didn’t know there was a different cover until I saw it in one of jessethereader’svideos. I’m not a fan of books with models/real people on the cover. It just puts me off a bit. The new cover is simple, white and the drawing of Celaena is just so badass.
Abraxos – a book that’s better on the inside than it looks on the outside

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It’s not hard to ignore that the first edition cover of The Great Gatsby is well… not nice. I’m taking this topic in the sense of the book cover is awful, but the story inside is truly wonderful. There’s rich people, lavish parties, secrets and lies. I Love it so darn much.

Erilea – a series with great world building

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The world that immediately came to mind is that of the Darker Shade of Magic series.  In this book there are four different Londons: Grey London which lacks magic and is ruled by a mad king, Red London were magic is revered in a flourishing empire, White London ruled by whoever murders their way to power, and Black London… which no one mentions. The description of each of these realms is so rich and beautiful. I felt like I was walking through them while reading this book.

Rifthold – a book that combines genres

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Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children is told through the medium of prose and creepy old photographs. It takes the basic things that make something horror-esque and combines it with magical fantasy elements. I didn’t expect to enjoy this book as much as I did because horror just isn’t for me. But this book is too good not to miss.

 

Damaris – a book based on/inspired by a myth or legend

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Hear me out on this one… Yes I have mentioned before on this blog that I’m not a fan of Percy Jackson, nor do I intend to finish the series BUT I have read The Lightning Thief and this was the first (and only) thing to come to mind when I looked at this question.

Kaltain Rompier – a book with an unexpected twist

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The last book I read that really made me gasp, splutter and drop it was A Grimm Warning which is the third book in The Land Of Stories series. Seriously, this ending nearly killed me. I need to get on to the fourth book pronto!
Assassin’s Keep – a book with an unreliable narrator

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I brought this up with a group of people a while ago and they disagreed with me however, I find that the protagonist – Charlie – is unreliable. The story is told through letters he writes to someone unknown (it reads like he’s writing the letters to you) talking about aspects of his life, mainly his internal struggles. Some of the things he chooses to and not to tell just makes me doubt whether I can trust him.

Asterin Blackbeak – a book that’s got squad goals

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Ultimate squad goals award goes to the shadowhunters of The Mortal Instruments universe. They just make a really cool badass team with the occasional help of warlock Magnus Bane.

 

Terrasen – a book that feels like home

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Harry Potter has been such a monumental part of my life. I grew up reading these books. I followed the characters from children to adulthood as I went through the process myself. Even though I hated school, the idea of Hogwarts (even with the workload) just fills me with warmth and happiness in a world where I can use Accio to get me things when I’m too lazy to move. Whenever I pick up any of the books and re-read them, I feel like I’m going home and returning to old, well-loved friends.

 

Aelin Ashryver Galathynius – a book with the power to destroy you

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Allegiant – the final book in the Divergent Trilogy – utterly ruined me. This was the most I’ve cried reading a book next to Harry Potter. I think this is probably my favourite in the trilogy because even though the ending is so bittersweet, it feels like the right ending for this book.

 

Manon Blackbeak – a book that intimidated you

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This is without a doubt one of the most beautifully written books I have ever read. And I doubt I will find anything in my lifetime that tops it. This is the story of a German girl called Liesel who steals books… and the narrator of her adventures is death. You read that right, death. However, this book is huge. I am quite a quick reader but it took me a good month to get through this one.

 

Ronan Whitehorn – a book that makes you swoon

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I had to sit and think really hard for this one. I guess I’m just cold and heartless as I resorted to scrolling through my read list on Goodreads in the hopes of finding a suggestion. Then I came across Eleanor & Park. This book is so cute and the relationship formed between Eleanor and Park is adorable.

 

Chaol Westall – a book that challenged you to see things differently

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I bought a copy of this book along with the new, recently recovered Which Pet Should I Get? Purely because there was a line from Oh The Places You’ll Go that helped me get through high school: “You have brains in your head, you have feet in your shoes, you can steer yourself any direction you choose.” I knew this quote but had never actually read the book.

As a recent university graduate who is back in her hometown, living with her parents, not exactly doing or being where she wants to in life, I feel a bit stuck. Reading this book helped get things into perspective for me and made me see that sometimes being stagnant is all part of the journey and just because I’m in this position now, doesn’t mean I will be forever.

 

Fleetfoot – a book that you received as a gift

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This books was given to me as a git by my wonderful writer friend Jenny.  It’s an Alice In Wonderland spin-off kind of thing. I am still yet to read it but look how gorgeous this cover is!

 

Eye of Elena – A book you found right when you needed it

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I discovered this book at a really difficult time in my life and without it, I truly don’t know where I would have ended up. It gave me the courage and the strength to keep going on, when all I wanted to do was give up.

 

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children's fiction

“A Series Of Unfortunate Events” – The Importance Of Reading As A Child

Recently I watched the movie adaptation of A Series Of Unfortunate Events, based on the first three books in the collection of the same name, by Lemony Snicket.

Film Title: Lemony Snicket's: A Series of Unfortunate Events.

While the film was painfully mediocre, it took me back to an important aspect of my childhood: reading.

When I was a child, if I saw a toy I wanted, my mother would make me wait a week to see if I really wanted it. Seven days later, we would go back to the shop and I would have no recollection of what toy I’d got upset over not being able to have, let alone how badly I had supposedly wanted it, However, if it was a book I wanted, she’d say yes. And so began my adventures of reading. The book fair days at Primary school when those metal containers full of books were wheeled across the playground were a bigger event than Christmas to me. Mother would give me a money limit, and I would be let loose.

It was at one of these events that I discovered A Series of Unfortunate Events. The blurb is an example of genius, playing on the whole “saying don’t do it will make a kid want to do it more”:

“Dear Reader,

I’m sorry to say that the book you are holding in your hands is extremely unpleasant. It tells an unhappy tale about three very unlucky children. Even though they are charming and clever, the Baudelaire siblings lead lives filled with misery and woe. From the very first page of this book when the children are at the beach and receive terrible news, continuing on through the entire story, disaster lurks at their heels. One might say they are magnets for misfortune.

In this short book alone, the three youngsters encounter a greedy and repulsive villain, itchy clothing, a disastrous fire, a plot to steal their fortune, and cold porridge for breakfast.

It is my sad duty to write down these unpleasant tales, but there is nothing stopping you from putting this book down at once and reading something happy, if you prefer that sort of thing.

With all due respect,

Lemony Snicket”
(Take from The Bad Beginning)

How could any child put the book back after reading that?!

Every single one of these books terrified me. I had horrible nightmares and used to hide the books in my wardrobe. Despite how scared I was, I continued reading book after book in this series out of a different kind of fear: if I wasn’t there for the characters, who else would be?
Now, would I have had this kind of mentality if I was a budding reader? Probably not.

To this day, A Series of Unfortunate Events was the first book series I ever read. And little me carried that as a badge of honor because I pushed through that fear to “protect” the characters until the very end.

Watching this film made me think about other books  I devoured in my childhood years.

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I’m pretty sure everyone from my generation read Roald Dahl at some point. But here is another example of my childish fears coming into play. I had the animated version of The BFG on video tape and used to watch it, truthfully, more than I sat re-reading the books. The giants terrified me. Specifically one sequence when Sophie and the BFG have to get past the nasty sleeping giants.

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Though these scenes were watched cowering behind my hands, I still had that mentality of “I can’t turn it off, I can’t abandon Sophie and the BFG!” As if me persevering with the film or books in general that made me uncomfortable had some affect on the story.

One fear I haven’t been able to shake is spiders.

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I remember being given this book. Thankfully I was too young to understand parts of the story (like Fern’s dad planning to kill Wilbur) but the spider just terrified me and I remember getting upset thinking that my mother had named me after a creepy crawlie with eight legs. While this didn’t teach me to face my fears, it did teach me the importance of friendship and embracing the differences between you and your friends.

Bedtime stories, if read by my mother were always the same:

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A wonderful collection of stories following the animals in the hundred acre woods. Again teaching me about the importance of friendship and courage. I still have my original hardbacked edition kept safe.

One day, my mother came home from work, called me over and placed a copy of The Magician’s Nephew by C.S.Lewis.

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This book/series opened me up to worlds I didn’t know existed. The possibility of going on adventures to uncharted, unknown places. Narnia: with talking animals, magic, kings and queens. It revolutionized my reading and made me want to read more about places that existed beyond the boring regular world.

This is where the children’s book industry fell down. They focused on producing the books, but not maintaining the readership. There was no “if you liked this, you might like this” to provide a pathway to other books that are similar.

So I floundered for a while until another day those metal containers were wheeled into the hall of my primary school. Eagerly scanning those shelves, I came across a book that would not just shape my childhood, but become a significant part of my life.

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I read the Harry Potter series in a strange order to begin with: 2 – 3 – 1- 4 to 7
This was just based on how I found them. While not the same as Narnia, the idea of a magic school and an array of creatures, and adventures to be had, had me hooked instantly. This was the first time I came across myself in a book: Hermione Granger – a girl who loved learning, constantly correcting people’s mistakes and always had her face stuck in a book. She was me! I am part of the Harry Potter generation. As Harry grew up, so did I. I feared when he faced Voldemort, smiled when he spent time at the burrow and laughed out loud when Lavender was pursuing Ron.

My most prominent childhood memory in terms of reading, that I can still remember vividly to this day, is sitting in class for the reading period. My teacher announces that our hour begins and every single person in the room, including the teacher, pulls out a copy of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix and begins reading.

Now if that’s not an example of a generation of children loving reading, then I don’t know what is.

While other books showed me that it was okay to be afraid and that you can get past the thing you’re afraid of, these books showed me that it’s okay to be afraid. What’s important, is acting in spite of that fear: the way Harry stands up to Voldemort in the graveyard after just witnessing Cedric’s death, the way he gives himself up to Voldemort at the battle of Hogwarts to prevent another life being lost. It taught me about the beauty of friendship and courage and love, not to be prejudice to others about the things they can’t change. These books will stay with me forever.

Another book that has stayed with me is this:

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This is the book that made me want to become a writer. My imagination was constantly filled with adventures I had in Neverland battling pirates, swimming with mermaids, dancing with the Indians.I adored this story. I adored the way it made me feel and I wanted to re-create that feeling for someone else. If I manage to do that in my lifetime as a writer, then I’ve achieved what I set out to do.

More recently I looked after my cousin’s soon to be three year old and she wanted me to read her a story. The picture book she picked out was this:

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I read it to her…. more than enough times and she always got scared by the bear. When I spoke to my cousin about it, she said that Faye started having nightmares about a bear coming to get her. My cousin spoke to the people at the nursery and it turned out they’d read her this book. My cousin’s solution? She bought Faye the book and read it to her, and told her that the bear only wanted to be friends with them. When I read it to Faye and she asked me why the bear looks sad at the end, I said the bear just wanted to be friends but had to go back to the cave otherwise you wouldn’t be able to tell the story again. After I explained this, she started to pretend to be scared and would giggle afterwards.
My cousin explained that when she came up with this “bear wanting to be friends” idea, Faye’s nightmares stopped.

Basically, what I’m trying to say is: reading is important. 

A child who reads will grow up with some much imagination and creativity. A child who reads will know that being scared is okay sometimes because *insert character’s name* was scared when they did that brave thing. A child who reads will have courage and value friendship.

Reading is beautiful and if I ever have children, I will make sure that they read.

Let me know what books you read as a child that stand out to you!

book tag

Disney Book Tag

The Little Mermaid – a character who is out of their element, a fish out of water

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Carson Phillips from Struck by Lightning is in his final year of high school and in the process of applying to University. To make himself stand out more on his application he tries to set up a Literary Magazine at the school. But there’s one problem – he isn’t exactly at the top of the social food chain. He uses his outsider knowledge of the populars to try and get them to write for his magazine the only way he knows how: by blackmailing them.
Cinderella – a character who goes through a major transformation

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Pip in Great Expectations goes through one of the biggest transformations I’ve read. He starts off as a lower class orphan boy helping out in his sister’s husband in the forge. When given the opportunity to meet with the mysterious Miss Havisham things for Pip start to take a turn in a brighter direction, and soon he is heading off to London to learn how to become a Gentleman.

Snow White – a book with an eclectic cast of characters

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If you haven’t read Harry Potter then return to the rock you’ve been living under and never speak to me again! For me, it’s frankly impossible to NOT pick this book series for this one. The cast is just so eclectic from the muggles to wizards to squibs to the houses to the animagi and various species.

Sleeping Beauty – a book that puts you to sleep

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As someone with a love of literature who extended that passion on to a university degree, I’ve had to muddle my way through a lot of classics. By far the worst has been Pride and Prejudice which I’ve had to re-read a lot of times. I just find the story so boring and the characters don’t really do much to save the plot. Not to mention Mr Darcy is awful and I can’t understand why anyone could possibly want someone like him.
The Lion King – a character who had something traumatic happen to them in childhood

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The Book of Lost Things follows David, a boy who loves books -especially fairy tales – and loves reading them to his ill mother. Sadly, she dies. Twelve year old David suffers badly from this loss and my heart just went out to him. I wanted to climb into the pages and give him a hug.
Beauty And The Beast – a beast of a book (a big book) that you were intimidated by, but found the story to be beautiful

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Anyone who knows me, will know that I can read a 400 page book in two days if I just sit down and read. I came across this book not long after its release and heard it was a beautiful book (just like the cover!) so I bought a copy. It’s a monster of a book and took me over a month to read because it’s rich and well written. The writing is unbelievably beautiful and I don’t think I will ever find a book as beautiful as this one.
Aladdin – a character who gets their wish granted, for better or worse 

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One specific event in The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer really sticks out at me for this one which is what I refer to as “the dog incident”. One day when Mara is coming home from school she finds a dog chained up in someone’s garden. The dog is clearly neglected and when she stands up to the owner, a not very nice man, she walks away wishing that something bad would happen to him. A few days later he is found dead in his home and the dog gets taken away to a better place.
Mulan – a character who pretends to be someone or something they’re not

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This book follows Tris, a sixteen year old who has her choosing ceremony coming up in which she must decide whether to stay or move factions. Each faction operates under a certain personality type and to help decide where you fit best you have to take a test prior to the ceremony. Tris’ results reveal that she fits into three of the five factions which makes her “Divergent.” These types of people are dangerous to society and slowly being killed off. So Tris has to hide the fact she’s Divergent and try to fit in.
Toy Story – a book with characters you wish would come to life 

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Peter Pan is my all-time favourite book and the reason I decided to pursue a life as a writer. If I could have any collection of characters come to life it would be the ones in this story. I can think of nothing better than flying through the sky with Peter Pan and fighting pirates with the lost boys.
Disney Descendants – your villain or morally ambiguous character

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One of my favourite “villains” is Camille Belcourt from The Mortal Instruments series. She’s just so sassy and evil and yay for vampires. She messes things up between Alec and Magnus but I love everything she does in this series.
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