Posted in review, Uncategorized

Virtually Sleeping Beauty – K.M.Robinson

“Find the girl; get out.”

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Blurb: “She may be doing battle in the virtual world, but in the real world, they can’t wake her up.”

K.M.Robinson has become known for fairytale retellings and Virtually Sleeping Beauty is no different. In this novella, she takes another classic tale and, this time, gives it a sci-fi twist.

The story follows Royce who learns that a girl called Rora has been playing the virtual reality game for longer than the allotted time. Becoming the hero, he delves into the universe hoping that he can be the one to break her free.

From the outset, the tension is palpable: there is the real sense that Rora’s life is on the line if the cast of characters don’t work quick to get her out of the game. Given this is a novella, I was glad to see this woven into the plot from the very first page. I thought it was a really interesting choice to tell the story from Royce’s point of view as it made him an onlooker to what Rora had to do due to the limitations of the game; he spends a lot of the story looking on, unable to help. Everything in this novella just seemed to pull together so perfectly that when I turned the page and was met with the acknowledgements, I felt almost cheated.

I did have a few typos in my kindle copy so I wish more time had been taken to make sure these errors weren’t present, and I wish the story was a little more developed as I would’ve liked to see more details and places within the game itself.

But overall, K.M.Robinson adds another marvellous read to her catalogue.

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Posted in discussion

Why I Love Book Acknowledgements

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Back in the day, before the internet, (yes I am that old) the only way I could learn more about those people behind the books was through acknowledgements. I didn’t even know what my favourite authors looked like, so it was a chance to peek behind the curtain in some way.

Book acknowledgements are stories in themselves. A name that could mean nothing to me, means everything to someone else. Did they sit there over coffee with the author who groaned endlessly about a chapter that didn’t work? Have they been life-long friends? Maybe they’re another writer who understands the plight of creating a new world. As social media has developed and expanded, readers can now interact with their beloved creators on a daily basis. We feel closer as we see their friendships play out in the virtual world (take Becky Albertalli, Adam Silvera and Angie Thomas, for example). Those names littered in the acknowledgment are often familiar now, but it doesn’t make them any less magical.

When a close friend of mine, K.M.Robinson, released her debut book Golden, I was overjoyed to read it after hearing about it for so long. At the time of writing this (I say that because she is a machine and could have written five more by the time this is posted), she has sixteen books out in the world. As I reached the inevitable end, I turned to the acknowledgements and froze when I saw not just my name, but a whole paragraph dedicated just to little old me. I will be grateful for this for the rest of my life.

My favourite thing about it is that it’s a collection of inside jokes. To anyone else, this is jut nonsense;  a weird footnote in a list of thank yous. But to me, it is everything.

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Posted in fairytale retelling, review, young adult

Locked – K.M.Robinson

“We ourselves, can overtake the society. If we can get resistance groups to join us, there’s no way the society will survive.”

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Blurb: “When the girl with the golden hair is betrayed, no one has hope of surviving. The stories say that Goldilocks ran away, but being forced over the wall and separated from the man she cares for was hardly her choice. Now, uncertain if any of her friends survived the brutal attack, Auluria must work with her former handler, Shadoe, and raise a new army to invade the Society and take back that which is hers: Dov Baer, his family, their friends, and their freedom.”

Locked is the second book in a trilogy bringing the fairytale of Goldilocks back to life with a new twist. The society has even more power, and they also have Dov Baer which makes Auluria’s desire to take them down all the more personal.

Auluria is forced to team up with her enemies, one of which being Shadoe, in order to find the best way to regain her control.  Auluria makes a lot of questionable decisions and trusts everyone she meets straight away if they are willing to help her; which could be a very risky move but also makes her more human as it shows the sort of lengths people are willing to go to get their loved ones back.

I am an absolute sucker for training scenes in books and this one is packed full of them. It was great to see the team Auluria had created pushing themselves to be better. Speaking of which, the new characters really stood on their own ground and it didn’t feel like the story was over-populated with new faces.

My big issue in Golden was the pacing but in this one, those issues are a distant memory. The story progresses at the right speed to keep readers interested but also allow for a decent chunk of time for the characters to be in the right place to finally take back what’s theirs.

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Posted in review, romance, young adult

Jaded – K.M.Robinson

“I have always been warned to stay away from Roan Diamond. He is the enemy. He is dangerous. But today I will marry him. And it’s not my choice.”

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Blurb: “Her father failed in his mission to take control from the Commander, a defeat that has cost Jade her life. She will die as punishment. Now she belongs to the Commander’s son—as his wife. Knowing his intent is to quietly kill her in revenge, Jade’s every move is calculated to survive—until she learns her death ensures the safety of her father and her entire town.”

Jade’s father tried to overthrow the commander and failed. As a result, Jade must marry the commander’s son, Roan. But not everything is as it seems and Jade knows all too much about the plot to have her killed.

This is the second book from K.M.Robinson and showcases one of my favourite things: author growth. As I read more books from the same author, I look for signs of improvement from their previous book. Not to sound super critical or that I’m purposely looking for fault, but it’s wonderful to see a writer evolve with every new story , and K.M.Robinson achieves this with Jaded.

The pacing was perfect. Everything felt like it happened when it needed to and allowed enough time to get to know and understand the characters as well as get a solid footing in the world. A multi-perspective narrative is used at first which, given the plot, I thought might ruin the mystery as you could see Roan’s side and what plots were made to kill Jade, but it did the opposite. It made it more exciting. I was on the edge whenever Jade did anything; unaware of what was about to be thrown at her. I found myself falling for Roan at points only to pull back, realising everything he was doing was artificial, a trick to lower Jade’s defences.

Jade is the kind of female character I’ve been yearning for. I loved how she wasn’t like the ‘strong typical female;” she was everything. Brave but not afraid to cry. Strong and outspoken, but quiet when she needed to stay alive.

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Posted in fairytale retelling, review, young adult

Golden – K.M.Robinson

“Betrayal is always bad, but betrayal by someone close is so much worse.”

 

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Blurb: “The stories say that Goldilocks was a naïve girl who wandered into a house one day. Those stories were wrong. She was never naïve. It was all a perfectly executed plan to get her into the Baers’ group to destroy them.
Trained by her cousin, Lowell, and handler, Shadoe, Auluria’s mission is to destroy the Baers by getting close to the youngest brother, Dov, his brother and sister-in-law and the leaders of the Baers’ group. When she realizes Dov isn’t as evil as her cousin led her to believe, she must figure out how to play both sides or her deception will cause everyone in her world to burn.”

This is an extra special blog post this week as the book in question, Golden, has been written by a dear, dear friend of mine. (Though I feel obligated to add that this doesn’t change my review)

The story is a goldilocks retelling and follows a girl called Auluria who wakes up in the home of the Baer family with no memory of how she got there. Thanks to help of Dov, she slowly starts to fill in the gaps. She was running from someone but she still can’t remember who. As her memories continue to surface she remembers her purpose of being in this house: to make Dov Baer fall in love with her, then destroy his family.

I am an absolute sucker for political elements of books, especially in a medieval/fairytale sort of setting and Golden really delivers that. On one side you have the government ruling with an iron fist and on the other you have The Society with the Baer family in the middle. All these aspects were explained so well and alongside with the world building there was the perfect framework for a story. It didn’t fall into “info dump” territory and instead felt like the process of learning and discovering this world was authentic.

Auluria proves to be a great but equally frustrating character at times as she doesn’t feel she should just sick back in a safe space when she’s more than capable of going out and fighting.

I only have a few issues and the main one is pace: it feels like Auluria’s memory returns too quickly and it would have been nice to spend more time with Auluria exploring her surroundings and forming an even more natural relationship with Dov; the love itself once her memory comes back feels too rushed as well. This is the first book in a trilogy and it felt like it was trying to get enough groundwork in that we can speed into the next one.

But that didn’t take away from my enjoyment. I find the complexities of this world so fascinating and can only wait with bated breath until I can get my hands on the next one.

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