Posted in discussion

The Right Way To Read…

The book community is truly a wonderful place to be. I originally started this book because I wanted to create an online space where I could talk constantly about books without feeling like I have to apologise for word-vomiting my love for stacks of paper. I’ve grown to learn more about the industry and try some books I would never have touched of my own accord. Conversations are constantly streaming in this community from the latest movie news, book announcements, what readers are loving at the moment… But with the good side, there is also a bad one to balance everything out.

Every so often I see readers complaining about how others choose to read/what others choose to read; going on rants about over-hyped books not actually deserving the attention they get,  shaming others for the age range they enjoy, the genre, the tropes they devour. Recently, authors seem to have become a lot more vocal about the money side of dedicating their lives to creating fictional worlds. As the pressure has continued to build, it’s become hard for me to buy book without feeling some sort of guilt as I try to work out just how much of the money spent will be going directly to the authors I adore. So, with all of this in mind, what is the best way to read?

 

Audiobooks

Audiobooks have surged in popularity in recent years, causing many publishers to start dedicating more money and time to expanding their collections. Over the past year, I’ve fallen back in love with audiobooks. Readers can multi-task, some books work better in audio form because the narrator is just so good. But there’s a lot of stigma around whether they are “real reading.” It’s a silly argument to me as you’re still enjoying the story and also it allows those with sight difficulties to fall in love with these tales just the same way as everyone else.
E-Readers

With extensive deals and discounts, it’s no surprise that readers are often against the idea of E-Books. The dreaded electronic devices have been at the centre of many disagreements and I used to be firmly against one… until I actually got one. For people with sight issues, text can be altered both in font and size to make it more readable.

 

Books

Yes, it seems like a rather obvious one, I know. Of course the best way to read books is to… read books. But where exactly do you get your books from? The supermarket or a high street book store? The library or online? What about your local charity shops? A big criticism made towards the video community, Booktube, is the lack of mentions about independent places, libraries or charity shops. (Again, we’re back to the theme of shaming) I’ve seen many people feel like they are superior because they bought their latest stack of books for 50p each.

Basically, this is a long winded way of me making the point that it shouldn’t matter how you read. It should matter than you’re reading at all. That you’re out there blogging about the books you love or just recommending it to those in your real life. Do not ever feel shamed for what you choose to read or how you chose to enjoy those books (as long as it is legal of course!)

What are your thoughts?

Let me know your favourite way to read!

Posted in fantasy, review

Short Stories from Hogwarts of Heroism, Hardship and Dangerous Hobbies – J.K.Rowling

“Minerva McGonagall was one of only a handful of people who knew, or suspected, how dreadful a moment it was for Albus Dumbledore when, in 1945, he made the decision to confront and defeat the dark wizard Gellert Grindelwald.”

 

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Blurb: “These stories of heroism, hardship and dangerous hobbies profile two of the Harry Potter stories’ most courageous and iconic characters: Minerva McGonagall and Remus Lupin. J.K.Rowling also gives us a peak behind the closed curtain of Sybill Trelwaney’s life, and you’ll encounter the reckless, magical-beast-loving Silvanus Kettleburn along the way.”

When I first heard about even more Harry Potter material being launched into the world, I was both excited and sceptical. I will be reviewing each book over the course of this week so if you’re interested, keep an eye out.

This collection is basically the short stories that can be found on Pottermore, which as a free site makes the release of these ebooks feel very much like another chance to cash in on the new hype around the series. However, if you’re someone who’s a sucker for backstories then you’ll really enjoy Heroism, Hardship and Dangerous Hobbies.

It’s split into four sections, focusing on different heroic characters from the Harry Potter series. Those are: Minerva McGonagall, Remus Lupin, Sybill Trelawny and Silvanus Kettleburn. The reader is given an insight into the lives of each of these characters along with learning more about the history of aspects they are linked to such as the “prejudice of werewolves” for Lupin and “history of the animagus” for McGonagall.

It’s a fun, quick little read and sure to give heart-warming feelings to any Harry Potter fans.

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