Posted in discussion

Nineteen Years Later

19yearslater-640681

*spoilers for the series*

The first of September rolled around and, leading up to 11am, I was sat on twitter. As usual, I was tweeting about how I had arrived too early to get the Hogwarts Express and so was sitting in my regular carriage with way too many chocolate frogs for the journey. I was not the only one tweeting about the upcoming departure of a train to magic school (many hashtags about the significance of the date were trending) and received may responses from people asking if there was room for a Ravenclaw in my cabin. I replied with “of course! I have some Fizzing Whizbees if you want to share.”

To the milder or non-Harry Potter fans, this turn of events will seem completely bizarre. After all, the Wizarding World is not real (hard to digest, I know!) and, rather than being docked out in Hufflepuff robes on a train stationed at a secret platform, really I was sitting in bed in my Harry Potter themed PJs pretending that I was. Also, even in an alternate world where Hogwarts did exist, I would be way to old to attend. But to me, these scenarios remind me of what it feels like to be home.

My adventures with Harry Potter began when the Scholastic Book Fair came to my primary school and we were allowed time out of class to go and buy something if we had the money. Armed with the funds my mother had supplied, I went on my way and came across a book called Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. I don’t remember what it was that struck me about it but I bought it and read it; not realising it was actually the second book in the series. By the time I had caught up with the ones that were already out, there was a brand new one waiting for me. My first read-through of the books was 2-3-1-4-7.

I used to have two light switches in my room: one by the door and a pull string above my bunk bed. It would drive my mother bonkers when she’d get up in the night to find my bedroom light on and me tucked up in bed reading very late on a school night. When my mother too got into the books we had one copy of Order of the Phoenix  which I would be allowed to read one chapter of each night before mother would come and take it off me to ensure I slept. She would then take the book downstairs and read it herself. Both this book and Half Blood Prince used to have two bookmarks in indicating where we were. To this day, my most prominent memory of Harry Potter was reading period in school, during Year 4, when my teacher said that the hour had begun and we must remain silent. I was in a class of 30 children and every single one of us had a copy of Order of the Phoenix. Even the teacher. I think that was the first moment that I really got a sense of how Harry Potter was so much bigger than my sole experience with it. To say I’ve grown up with this world and these characters is too much of an obvious statement to make, and frankly it frustrates me that I can never full put into words why this particular series has had such a impact on me when other series I read around the same time (for example The Chronicles of Narnia) are forgotten memories. It’s the kind of thing where only other extreme Harry Potter fans can share a look and say “I know exactly what you mean.”

Harry Potter has remained a constant in my life. No matter the situation, it’s always been there when I’ve needed it and it always feels like being greeted by old friends.

ewfudsbj

1st September 2017 held more importance than the previous years. This year in the Harry Potter timeline, marks the epilogue. This year marks nineteen years later. As I write this post, we have officially passed the Harry Potter timeline. (Don’t talk to me about Cursed Child)

As the hosts of Mugglecast joked on their podcast (Episode 334: Back to Hogwarts?), “how many more endings to Harry Potter are we going to get?!” While easy to laugh at, it’s true. There have been many endings to Harry Potter. The books ended and a few years later so did the film adaptations. Then Cursed Child (*shudder*) and in a few more years the Fantastic Beasts films will end. When I read that iconic last line in Deathly Hallows I cried for two weeks. Having been lucky enough to go to Orlando and visit the theme park, along with going to the studio tour several times (I’m going for the fourth time next month for my birthday. Eek!) it never really felt like the definitive end. Until now.

As I said earlier, I grew up with Harry Potter and aged alongside him. Even with my adult perspective now when I read the books I still get that all consuming feeling that I honestly cannot explain. I can pinpoint who I was and where I was when each book came out and list all of the places I read them.

Officially passing the timeline for the books has stirred a feeling in me and it’s not a pleasant one. In a strange way, it’s like I’ve been reminded of my own morality; that I will continue to age while the characters that were so present in my formative years do not. I am trying not to be sad about it and instead distract myself with happier Harry Potter memories. But it’s not without its struggles.

For the first time it really feels like this is goodbye.

Posted in fantasy, review

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child -J.K.Rowling, John Tiffany and Jack Thorne

“Hogwarts will be the making of you, Albus. I promise you, there is nothing to be frightened of there.”

 

511zpEl8PYL

Blurb: “It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn’t much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the ministry of magic, a husband, and father of three school-age children. While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes darkness comes from unexpected places.”

When it was first announced that there was going to be, in essence, another Harry Potter book, naturally I experienced mixed emotions. Harry Potter remains to be my all-time favourite series to the point where I feel like it’s a part of me. Alongside that the ending was so perfect that I was faced with the reality of what may happen if this extension was sub-par in comparison. After all, you can’t unread a book. I was happy to get an opportunity to experience this new story in some form as tickets to the West End shows are so limited that even if I managed to get my hands on them, I wouldn’t be able to afford travel costs to London.

The story takes place right where Deathly Hallows leaves off: on platform 9 ¾ with Harry sending his son Albus off to Hogwarts for the first time. I expected Albus to be the primary focus on this adventure and while he is in a lot of ways, we get to see into the lives of our favourite golden trio and what became of them nineteen years after the battle of Hogwarts.

The first thing I will say about Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is that you can’t really give it a rave review or a terrible rating because this is a script and plays are meant to be seen not read. It took a while to get used to the format but once getting over that hurdle it’s easy to follow what’s happening. A lot is left to your own imagination as you’re just reading stage directions and dialogue rather than getting the pages of description that you would if it was a novel. I really enjoyed the path this story took and it’s easy to see why Scorpius Malfoy is becoming a favourite. I feel like the right parts of the adventures were depicted through the scenes and I just felt like I was home. There are a few things I found issues with and sometimes I felt the turn of events were too convenient but overall, as an addition to the Harry Potter timeline, I am very happy with it.

I’ve seen a lot of reviews saying that Cursed Child reads like fan fiction because the characters don’t “read” authentically and while I understand why readers think that, it’s important to remember that these characters fought in a war and they are all in their late 30’s so Harry is bound to not be like he was when he was 11.

Personally I found the first part much better than the second part which I think could have done with more work.

I came out of this experience sad that it’s over, relieved that it lives up to my expectations, but also happy getting to see how everyone was doing nineteen years later.

For more of my reading adventures follow me on Goodreads

For my writing adventures follow me on Twitter

For my videos, check out my Youtube

For bookish photographs follow my instagram: @charlottereadsthings

Posted in discussion, fantasy

The Importance of Hermione Granger

hpphilo-ew02

In honour of the release of additional Harry Potter material in the form of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, it seems only fitting to talk about how much this series has shaped my life. However, that could take years to fully explain so for now you will have to accept this rather shortened version.

I first discovered the Harry Potter books when I was 7/8 years old. I was wandering around the giant metal crates of books as the Scholastic book fair was at my primary school. My mum had always pushed me towards reading: if I wanted a toy she would make me wait a week and if I still wanted it then I could have it. If it was a book, I could have it right away. She sent me to school that day with money to go to the book fair and get whatever I want. That day when I eagerly scanned the shelves of the various containers, I came across a book called Harry Potter and the chamber of secrets. At the time I wasn’t aware this was the second book and I devoured it. I found out that there were in fact three books out at that point and my first read through went 2nd book, 3rd book, 1st book and then 4-7.

There’s no way I can really encapsulate how much this series meant to me, not only growing up, but even now. It gave that escapism I needed as a child and I was just in awe of this world that I was thrown into. I followed this small orphan boy into a world of magic and wonder, facing something so much bigger than him. I pictured myself fighting alongside them, defending them where needed. I saw myself sat in black robes lined with yellow at the Hufflepuff table in the Great Hall. I had found a place where I belonged. My mum would let me read one chapter a night before bed and then take the book off me and read it herself. We always had 2 bookmarks in our copy of the most recent book because she would take it to work with her and I’d get it when I got home from school. My most prominent childhood memory is sitting in class and my teacher declaring that our reading hour had started. Every single child in that room pulled out a copy of Harry potter and the Order of the Phoenix and began reading. Including my teacher.

Naturally, I adore the movies but there’s so much magic that you don’t get in those compared to the books and every year I find myself coming back to those books, even if it is only one of them. This series was by no means the first I read as a child, but it was the first that really stuck with me. When we went on holidays where we took the car (like getting the ferry across to France) I would demand we listen to the Harry potter audiobooks and I’d sit in the back reading the book along with the soothing tones of Stephen Fry.

When the final book came out, I stared at it for the first two days. We had two copies of the book at that point so mum was well into her copy, but I was terrified of the adventure ending, of parting away with the characters that had been the only real friends I ever had. One night, at 4am, mum came running into my room because I was hysterically crying; Fred Weasley had just died. At that time, I didn’t realise that they would continue walking alongside me to this day. At twenty years old, I was having fights with university friends about which Hogwarts house was superior, my university had both a Harry Potter and a Quidditch society. Some of the best people in my life right now became my friends because of our love for this story. At nearly twenty three, my car keys are attached to a Hufflepuff crest keychain. When I went to the Harry Potter worlds in Universal and the Harry Potter studios, I cried.

This blog post is title “the importance of Hermione Granger” because she was the first time I saw myself as a character in a book. Of course I’d read many books with characters who loved reading but Hermione Granger didn’t just love reading, she loved learning too. She didn’t just have a fascination for the magical subjects of Hogwarts (as she’d lived 11 years of her life in a non-magical world) but she even loved Muggle Studies; a topic about something she already knew probably more of than the teachers did. She is made fun of throughout the books for being the one with her hand always in the air to answer questions, always doing her homework on time and demanding that Harry and Ron start revising for their exams. Her knowledge saves Harry and Ron’s lives countless times. Out of all the things she could use a time turner for in the third book (minus the obvious plot point) she uses it to attend more classes than is physically possible to do without manipulating time. In Deathly Hallows she fills her bag with over ten books just in case there might be any useful information in them that could help further down the line: something that Harry doesn’t even think of when he originally plans to go alone.

My point is she loved reading and she loved learning but more importantly she never changed. She could’ve so easily shrunk inside herself and contained the things that made her such a remarkable character but she never hid her love for either of those things. She showed me that devotion to something you love is important and you should never ever be afraid to passionate about the things that mean the most to you.
For more of my reading adventures follow me on Goodreads

For my writing adventures follow me on Twitter

For my videos, check out my Youtube

For bookish photographs follow my instagram: @charlottereadsthings