Posted in discussion

When A Book From Your Favourite Author Misses The Mark

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We all have writers that we’d die for. We spend hours in queues with armful books waiting for that memorable encounter, we buy endless editions of their books, feel close to them on social media platforms. But what happens when you don’t like a book from them?

Learning as much as I have over the past few years about the best ways to support authors, it’s no surprise that number one is… actually buying their books. I’ve had many instances of starting a new book from an author I love with every fibre of my being, only to really not enjoy it at all. I’ve watched all the five star ratings roll in feeling like I’ve completely missed something, when really it was just the simple fact that the story wasn’t for me. Big name authors are not exempt from this: every book from F.Scott Fitzgerald that isn’t The Great Gatsby, V.E.Schwab’s This Savage Song, even The Magisterium Series which is co-written by Cassandra Clare hasn’t managed to avoid this issue.

I did a whole separate blog post about how even old favourites have fallen prey to this revelation. Books that I once screamed from the rooftops about are now stuck with 3 star ratings, others I couldn’t finish because I didn’t want my old memories of them to be sullied by my lack of enjoyment.

It took me a long time to come to terms with the fact that the way to show the authors I love how much they mean to me is by… well… what I’m doing right now: talking about them and promoting them at every opportunity. Because if I love them, there’s sure to be other readers out there that will too.

Are there any books from beloved authors that you didn’t like? Are there any you wish you loved because of the hype?

Posted in Charlotte Writes Things, Uncategorized

Charlotte Writes Things | Author Inspirations – V.E.Schwab

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I think you could ask pretty much anyone who their “role model” is and they would have an answer. It could be a family member, a friend, a celebrity. Some may even have one from childhood and a different one now they have more of an adult perspective to grasp onto the world with. I’ve had many. I almost like to hord them as if they are trinkets from different parts of my past. When it comes to writing, the person I look up to the most is V.E.Schwab.

V.E.Schwab is a New York Times Best-selling author. She’s written Adult Fantasy, YA paranormal, graphic novels, children’s ghost stories but her very obvious success isn’t what draws me to her. Like many readers, my adventures with her stories began with A Darker Shade Of Magic and when I listened to her interview on the podcast 88 Cups Of Tea, she talked about how she had been told by those in the publishing industry to be less open about what it’s actually like to be in it. She responded to this by saying that it didn’t feel right to sugarcoat her experiences and act like, just because she got that book deal, her life is all sunshine and flowers.

I adore her honesty. She admits how hard touring is on her mental health and how it adds pressure to looming deadlines even though she very much loves meeting her readers. When it comes to drafting a new book, she talks openly about her struggles and how often she needs to remind herself that it’s all one big process and baby steps still get you closer to the end. She dishes out advice and it always seems to pop up on my Twitter timeline when I’m having the worst day and want to throw my laptop out of the window in the hopes that a passing car on the street runs it over.

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It’s a reminder that even the greats – the authors that have made incredible impacts in the writing world – are just as human as the rest of us. They have to work through the same fears and problems that those of us aspiring authors do every day. V.E.Schwab has spoken about how, even with her raging success, she’s still had rejections for pitch ideas. Other big fantasy authors such as Neil Gaiman have said that their biggest fear is a blank page. No one is immune from this experience and I admire her so much for standing up and saying “hey guys, this is really hard and you know what? It doesn’t get any easier.”

Do you have any writing inspirations?

Do you have any writing mantras you turn to when having a bad day?

Posted in discussion, Uncategorized

A Conversation With K.M.Robinson

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When I was first introduced to K.M.Robinson she was a social media guru teaching classes on the best ways for authors to utilize online platforms, along with growing her photography portfolio. Since then she has not only become a dear friend of mine, but gone on to grow an empire of books. As she continues to grow her fanbase, her knew Aladdin retelling marks the 23rd addition to her catalogue. I had the pleasure of getting to sit down and talk with her about books, advice for aspiring authors, and all things fairy tale.

For those who aren’t familiar with you and your books. Tell us about you!

I’m K.M. Robinson, author of retellings, dystopians, sci fi, fantasy, mermaid, cyberpunk, and steampunk novels. I’m also a social media marketing strategist who teaches entrepreneurs to to build profitable brands through smart social media strategy, and a professional photographer. I’m super friendly on social media and have created an incredible tribe of fans that I like to traumatize with my books. They’ve actually made support groups to get through some of them. It’s pretty awesome!

Your “trademark” has become writing fairy tale retellings. What is is about this genre that keeps you writing within it?

There are so many stories to tell and so many ways to write them. I’ve already written certain characters, but I still have two/three/four more ideas for different versions of their stories with other characters involved. All I have  to do is wonder what would happen if I dropped a certain character in a different setting and suddenly we have a brand new series. It’s an incredibly wide world with so much wiggle room. I can’t get enough! I also really like learning the “true” stories of these characters; the parts history forgot to tell us or flat out lied about.

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3.) You also shoot your own photography for/design your own covers. Was this a conscious decision or happy accident? 

I was a photographer first and many of my photo series inspired my writing, so it’s always something on my list of priorities when discussing contracts with publishers. I’ve taken a lot of time to study the industry and really know what sells for covers and what doesn’t. So when other authors/publishers started asking me to design for them as well, it was a natural transition. I really love being able to do most of my own covers because I can bring my stories to life in a way others wouldn’t be able to.

You’re very active on social media especially with instagram livestreams. Do you feel that social media is a significant tool aspiring writers need to make use of?

Absolutely. Social media is the best way to marker yourself and your products as a brand/business owner. It’s something all entrepreneurs (and that’s what an author is) need to learn as early as possible: Studying the algorithms, knowing what the platforms value to make such we get as much as a reach as possible, learning how to engage with people on the platforms, and studying how to create valuable content is essential. A lot of people see it as work but it’s such a fun way to connect with people and make new fans/friends. I adore studying social media and learning how to work with it. I’ve made so many new fans and great business connections just from being friendly and chatting with people – it’s great.

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Out of the many books you’ve written, is there a particular that’s your favourite?

My debut Golden, and my second book Jaded are definitely my favourite. I’v also really fallen in love with Sugarcoated. Strong leading ladies, assassination attempts, really cute guys. I love them!

What are some of your favourite fairy tale retellings?

The very first retelling that really stuck with me was The True Stories Of The Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka. It’s a picture book I read back in elementary school that told the story of how the Big Bad Wolf wasn’t actually bad and the little pigs were less than awesome. 

The idea that we might not actually know the true story-or the full story- really intrigued me. What if other stories were told like that? What if the villains weren’t actually villains? What if the heroes/victors lied? The “what if” questions led me to start looking for the second side to every story and really left this burning passion for me to discover more about the fairy tales I knew and loved. They’re directly responsible for me writing Golden, my Goldilocks and the Three Bears retelling. The rest is history. 

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Tell us about your new book!

Lions And Lamps is a steampunk Aladdin retelling. It pulls a lot more from the original Aladdin story (which was Chinese) rather than the version Disney did. My Aladdin lives with his mother after his father was murdered last year. His evil uncle, Kacper, is now trying to drive a wedge between Aladdin and his mother because he wants to look good in front of his sister-in-law now that his brother is dead. 

Cyra was an orphan who was taken in by the Governor seven years ago and trained to steal an airship in a competition that only he had advanced knowledge of. Last year, Cyra stole the airship and won, but this year she’s sneaking into the competition against the Governor’s wishes. 

When Aladdin and Cyra meet, sparks fly but not in a good way. There’s a lot of betrayal and back stabbing and a genie with an agenda. 

I’m so excited that its now out in the world, traumatizing my readers once more. Wait, did I say that out loud? Oops. 

All of K.M.Robinson’s books are available on E-book and from Amazon. She’s also hosting a sale of covers she’s designed for author use which is on until Tuesday 16th April and more information about that can be found here here.

K.M.Robinson can be found at:

 

Posted in discussion

The Right Way To Read…

The book community is truly a wonderful place to be. I originally started this book because I wanted to create an online space where I could talk constantly about books without feeling like I have to apologise for word-vomiting my love for stacks of paper. I’ve grown to learn more about the industry and try some books I would never have touched of my own accord. Conversations are constantly streaming in this community from the latest movie news, book announcements, what readers are loving at the moment… But with the good side, there is also a bad one to balance everything out.

Every so often I see readers complaining about how others choose to read/what others choose to read; going on rants about over-hyped books not actually deserving the attention they get,  shaming others for the age range they enjoy, the genre, the tropes they devour. Recently, authors seem to have become a lot more vocal about the money side of dedicating their lives to creating fictional worlds. As the pressure has continued to build, it’s become hard for me to buy book without feeling some sort of guilt as I try to work out just how much of the money spent will be going directly to the authors I adore. So, with all of this in mind, what is the best way to read?

 

Audiobooks

Audiobooks have surged in popularity in recent years, causing many publishers to start dedicating more money and time to expanding their collections. Over the past year, I’ve fallen back in love with audiobooks. Readers can multi-task, some books work better in audio form because the narrator is just so good. But there’s a lot of stigma around whether they are “real reading.” It’s a silly argument to me as you’re still enjoying the story and also it allows those with sight difficulties to fall in love with these tales just the same way as everyone else.
E-Readers

With extensive deals and discounts, it’s no surprise that readers are often against the idea of E-Books. The dreaded electronic devices have been at the centre of many disagreements and I used to be firmly against one… until I actually got one. For people with sight issues, text can be altered both in font and size to make it more readable.

 

Books

Yes, it seems like a rather obvious one, I know. Of course the best way to read books is to… read books. But where exactly do you get your books from? The supermarket or a high street book store? The library or online? What about your local charity shops? A big criticism made towards the video community, Booktube, is the lack of mentions about independent places, libraries or charity shops. (Again, we’re back to the theme of shaming) I’ve seen many people feel like they are superior because they bought their latest stack of books for 50p each.

Basically, this is a long winded way of me making the point that it shouldn’t matter how you read. It should matter than you’re reading at all. That you’re out there blogging about the books you love or just recommending it to those in your real life. Do not ever feel shamed for what you choose to read or how you chose to enjoy those books (as long as it is legal of course!)

What are your thoughts?

Let me know your favourite way to read!