Posted in children's fiction, review

A Pocketful Of Stars – Aisha Bushby

“I sit back and wait for magic to happen. But this isn’t a fairy tale, and princesses don’t wake up after kisses.”

pocmet

Blurb: “Safiya and her mum have never seen eye to eye. Her mum doesn’t understand Safiya’s love of gaming and Safiya doesn’t think they have anything in common. As Safiya struggles to fit in at school she wonders if her mum wishes she was more like her confident best friend Elle. But then her mum falls into a coma and, when Safiya waits by her bedside, she finds herself in a strange alternative world that looks a bit like one of her games.”

[AD – Gifted]

[Note: I am friends with the author but this in no way affects my review of this book]

A Pocketful Of Stars is the debut Children’s fiction book from Aisha Bushby who many will know from her short story in the BAME anthology A Change Is Going To Come. 

Safiya is an avid gamer and addicted to Studio Ghibli films. She’s forced to deal with failing friendships, an inability to stand up for herself, and the fact that her mother is in hospital. When she begins to have strange dreams involving a younger version of her mother in Kuwait, she becomes obsessed with trying to piece everything together in the hopes of her mother waking up.

Children are not exempt from bad things happening to them and having a serious topic, the possibility of grief, at the forefront of a book is something I really can see helping children who find themselves in similar situations. The house in Safiya’s dreams is crumbling and appears to build itself up which every “clue” from her mother’s past that she uncovers. The whole experience is described through the metaphor of a game where the player has to work through the levels by solving the mysteries in order to get to the boss level which is presented as a locked door which her grown up mother is behind. Safiya becomes unable to focus on anything but working out what the next piece is by trawling through her mother’s flat in the hopes of finding something she doesn’t even know she’s looking for. Grief and the possibility of loss is something that leaves people feeling completely helpless, willing to do anything to feel like they can shift the tide and fix things in some way. For Safiya, she feels it’s building up this image of a past life as she begins to see the younger version of her mother outside of dreams. Through this “game” she learns more about her mother’s history and how they are far more alike than she previously thought.

I adore books that have a magical element to them but it’s not entirely clear whether the magic is real or not. It leaves so much to be explored through interpretation and I think it will be exciting to see what other readers take away from the story.

Aisha Bushby has an amazing way of using visuals to illustrate her points. From the video game metaphor, to describing intense emotion as “party poppers in my chest.” It’s a collection of images I would have never thought up on my own but just completely fit every single time.

A Pocketful of Stars is beyond any words I could possibly use to describe it. I wish I could hand out bottles full of the emotions I had upon finishing because words just cannot do this book justice.

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Posted in contemporary, review, young adult

A Change Is Gonna Come

“Change is not inevitable or impossible; it requires imagination to picture how thing might be, as well as courage and tenacity to work to make the imagined a reality.”

change

Blurb: “Featuring top Young Adult authors alongside a host of exciting new talent, this anthology of stories and poetry from BAME writers on the theme of change is a long-overdue addition to the YA scene.”

*This book was sent to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review*

Diversity is a topic that constantly comes up in conversation in the book world. With a push to get more diverse voices out there both on the writing side and the industry side, and with the successes of new YA books like The Hate U Give, it really does feel like change is on the way.

A Change Is Gonna Come is a Young Adult anthology aiming to give voices to those who have “historically had their thoughts, ideas and experiences oppressed.” The overarching theme is change and contributors are from various BAME backgrounds. Well-known writers such as Nikesh Shukla (The Good Immigrant) and Patrice Lawrence (Orangeboy) have made contributions along with many fantastic debuts. When speaking to one of the latter, Aisha Bushby she talked about how Nikesh Shukla is wary of diversity becoming a marketing trend. She agrees and said that while diversity is important, she doesn’t want that aspect to detract from the quality of the stories.

My personal favourites from this collection are as follows:

“Marionette Girl” by Aisha Bushby tells the story of a girl with OCD who lives her life confined by time. This one is great for anyone who loves Harry Potter references. (Trigger warning for OCD and Anxiety)

“Hackney Moon” by Tanya Byrne is the story of how a same sex relationship falls apart over time. The writing is so poetic and beautiful that it reminded me of the writing style in The Book Thief.

“We Who?” by Nikesh Shukla showcases the breakdown of a friendship after the Brexit result of the referendum. It addresses the idea of “us v them” mentality and whether it’s possible to be tolerant of different views when you are the thing wishing to be tolerated.

There are many more wonderful additions to this anthology and the book has a glossary at the back with links to helplines and research websites if you are affected by any of the stories.

 
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